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The best business valuation method during a divorce

A common issue in divorce cases is how to determine the value of a business that is owned by one or both spouses. For property division purposes, it could be necessary to consult an experienced valuation analyst and to decide whether to appraise the business through a full valuation or a calculation of value. Massachusetts residents who own a business and are considering a divorce may benefit from learning about the options available to them.

A full valuation may be the preferred method if an arbitrator or judge requires the information to make a decision. The results of a full valuation are considered more reliable and have a greater degree of accuracy than a calculation of value. It is the optimal method for businesses with a complicated organization and assets.

The main drawback of choosing to use a full valuation is that it will take more time and money to complete than a calculation of value. The comparatively less cost in time and money of a calculation of value is mitigated by the fact that it is considerably less reliable than a full valuation and offers less certainty. The lesser degrees of reliability and certainty of a calculation of value is due to the fact that it does not require an in-depth analysis of a business as a full valuation.

Property division can be one of the most challenging aspects of the divorce process, and when a business is involved it can get even more complicated. In some cases, the couple's respective family law attorneys can assist in negotiating a settlement agreement that the parties may be more happy with than if the decision was left up to a judge.

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